Posts in category English

Workshop Future of Public Transport @Forum ISTS

Due to societal and technological trends, our mobility system and patterns might change. New modes are entering (and leaving) the market, while conventional modes are improved. In this workshop we looked to the future of public transport from the perspective of authorities and operators. The city of The Hague and the Dutch railways (NS) shared their visions on the public transport of the future.

Find the general workshop presentation HERE

Find the presentation of Emile Jutten (City of The Hague) on the national and regional vision on public transport HERE and an animation of the vision HERE

Find the presentation of Mark Oldenziel (NS) on the short term innovations and plans of the railways HERE and an animation of the vision HERE

How do Dutch train passengers (expect to) travel during and after Covid?

Thursday 5th November, the ETC Programme Committees for Local Public Transport and Rail Policy and Planning hosted a Covid webinar on: “How do Dutch train passengers (expect to) travel during and after Covid? Insights from a longitudinal panel of over 20,000 train passengers”, by Mark van Hagen (Netherlands Railways) and Niels van Oort (TU Delft). Together, Mark and Niels initiated a longitudinal survey amongst Dutch train travellers and how they cope with Covid with regard to their (future) travel patterns. In this webinar, they will share the main findings and lessons. A reflection from a wider EU perspective will also be given by András Munkácsy, Head of the Department for Transport Management at the KTI Institute for Transport Sciences, Hungary.

Find the presentation HERE

Travellers’ preferences towards existing and emerging means of access/egress transport

This research elaborates on access/egress transport in further detail and aims to provide insights in the preferences of travellers for existing and new means of access/egress transport such as shared vehicles and on-demand ride services. In this research, a stated preference experiment was performed with Dutch train travellers. In addition to the modal preferences, the expected impacts on land use near train station were assessed.

Find the ETC presentation of Bas Stam HERE

Subjective Beliefs regarding Waiting Times in Public Transport Networks in the Netherlands, Greece, and Portugal

Waiting times in public transport networks (PTNs) are inherently uncertain for travellers and, similar to other service industries, such uncertainty is likely to be a major cause for anxiety and frustration (Maister, 1985). While real-time information regarding waiting times is an important development in mitigating such negative feelings, they do not completely remove uncertainty. Even when information is provided, travellers process it on the basis of their individual attitudes, habits, experiences, and contemporary contextual variables. Yet, previous studies on behavioural responses to travel time unreliability have either (unrealistically) assumed that travellers know the objective travel time distributions or have studied behaviour within the artificial context of travel simulators. Quantifying travellers’ attitudes and perceptions — subjective beliefs — regarding waiting times may be critical for assessment of travel satisfaction and subsequently choice behaviour.

In this research, a stated preference experiment is used to quantify travellers’ attitudes and perceptions — subjective beliefs — regarding waiting times in public transport networks in three European countries. Results and potential policy implications are presented at the European Transport Conference (ETC).

Find the ETC poster of Sanmay Shelat HERE

Overview Bicycle+Transit research

Public Transport and Covid-19

How did Covid-19 affect public transport worldwide? BSc graduate Gerben van der Horst developed multiple time lapses to show the measures taken worldwide from January until June:

(Partial) shutdown of public transport services time lapse
Facemasks regulations time lapse
Lockdown time lapse

Find more information, references and data acknowledgements in the full report of Gerben van der Horst: HERE

In addition, find our Smart Public Transport Lab thoughtpiece on Public Transport in and after Covid-19: HERE

An overview of Covid-19 research of the Smart Public Transport Lab is provided: HERE

Podcast: Bicycle+transit mode

The bicycle+transit combination has been a growing mode for years now. It could offer the best of both worlds, if it is well designed with an integrated perspective. In this Dutch Cycling Embassy podcast with Geert Kloppenburg and Chris Bruntlet, we discuss about the opportunities and challenges regarding shared bicycle systems.

Find the podcast here:
Podcast Bicycle+Transit

Find the related references here:
Insights and overview research findings (lecture slides; Van Oort, 2020)

Shelat et al.(2017); Characteristics bicycle and transit users

Van Mil et al.(2020); Factors affecting the bicycle and transit mode

Ton et al. (2020); Factors catchment areas PT stops

Ma et al.(2020); Shared bicycle impacts on modal shift

Sustainable urban development with LRT: Lessons from Netherlands and Japan

Possibilities for the application of Light Rail Transit (LRT – light rail, tramway) as high-quality public transport in cities, urban regions are countless. Our article opens with the question about the specific characteristics of LRT. Then the question is asked which comprehensive argumentation LRT projects can justify. Finally, we examine the question of how these types of projects can be realized. Each of these three questions – What? Why? How? – is addressed on the basis of a set with two LRT main cases, respectively from the Netherlands and Japan.

Read the full article by Rob vd Bijl, Kiyohito Utsunomiya and Niels van Oort HERE

Understanding the Modal Shift in Response to Bike-sharing Systems in the City of Delft

The introduction of bike-sharing systems has revitalized cycling in many cities around the world. In general, the bike-sharing systems operated worldwide can be divided into two categories: docked bike-sharing and dockless bike-sharing. In the docked bike-sharing system, users have to rent bicycles from designated docking stations and then return them to the available lockers in the docking stations. The dockless bike-sharing system is designed to provide more freedom and flexibility to travellers in terms of bicycle accessibility. In contrast to docked bike-sharing, riders are free to leave bicycles in both physical and geo-fencing designated parking areas provided in public space with or without bicycle racks.

As a greener travel mode, bike-sharing is competitive in short distance travel and people who have long commuting distance are more likely to choose public transit integration with it. Previous research has shown that bike-sharing reduces car and taxi useage and increases cycling in almost every city. Bike-sharing system has been shown to reduce trip demand of public transportation including train, metro and bus.

In Delft as a student city in the Netherlands, cycling is seen as the most important mode of transport within the city. There exist three different bike-sharing schemes in operations, including OV-fiets, Mobike and Swapfiets. OV-fiets was introduced in the Netherlands in 2003 [4]. The bicycles should always be brought back to the location where the rental started. At this moment, there are almost 300 rental locations consisting of 20500 bicycles. Mobike is a dockless bike-sharing service and is more flexible than the existing docked bike-sharing alternative. Mobike extended the operations to Delft in March 2018 with a focus on the university campus. Swapfiets, launched in 2014, is a bicycle-rental system on a subscription basis, can be used for regular private trips. Now it has over 50,000 customers in 38 cities in Europe. The coexistence of different bike-sharing schemes in Delft enables this city to be a test bed for bike-sharing research.
This paper aims to understand the modal shift dynamics and the factors influence travellers’ choices in response to different bike-sharing systems by conducting a survey targeting OV-fiets users, Mobike users and Swapfiets users and private-bike users.

Find the CRB presentation and abstract of Xinwei Ma: Presentation and ABSTRACT

Ridership impacts of the introduction of a dockless bike-sharing scheme, a data-driven case study

In recent years, growing concerns over climate change, pollution, congestion and unhealthy lifestyles have contributed to increasing attention to sustainable transport modes such as cycling in general and more particularly the bicycle-transit combination. As part of the policy to promote cycling, bike-sharing programs were introduced in the past decades. The development of smart bicycle locks in combination with the possibilities of smartphones, made a new type of bike-sharing possible, in literature known as dockless, free-floating or fourth generation bike-sharing. In the new dockless, model, users are able to start and end their trip at their origin and destination without having to find a nearby docking station. Compared with traditional bike-sharing programs, dockless bike-sharing systems integrate mobile payment and global positioning system (GPS) tracking into the system; these features greatly increase the ease of use and management of the system.

This paper is set up around a pilot implementation of the dockless bike-sharing system of Mobike in Delft, the Netherlands. Our research deals with what can be learned from this pilot and analyzing the critical success factors for a sustainable bike-sharing system based on the data of the Delft Mobike pilot. The focus of this paper is on the combined bicycle and transit mode. This research is based on an experimental method for collecting operational data from the bikesharing system, being the first research based on trip data of a dockless bike-sharing system in Western Europe.

Find the Cycling Research Board abstract and presentation of Sven Boor: Presentation and ABSTRACT

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