Posts in category Presentations

Opportunities for the Combined Bicycle and Transit Mode

Around the world cities face negative effects generated by increasing mobility needs. To tackle these issues, mobility should be environmental and spatial friendly. Combining bicycle and public transport into a ‘bicycle + transit mode’ will create a synergy with the best of both worlds: superb door-to-door accessibility offered by the bicycle and a large spatial reach from transit modes. These complemented modes combined easily challenge private carsin terms of speed as well accessibility.

Research regarding the users and trip types of the bicycle and transit mode is largely missing. This is unfortunate, since understanding both user and trip characteristics is of the utmost importance to improve the share of the bicycle and transit mode. Policy-makers can make concrete decisions on infrastructure and service investments only when the gap between the aforementioned societal need and scientific knowledge is filled.

The main analysis in the study is based on data from the Netherlands. The Netherlands is one of the countries with a head start regarding the use of the bicycle + transit mode. A one-day trip diary survey, representative of the population of the Netherlands, with more than 250,000 respondents who made nearly 700,000 trips over the course of 6 years (2010-2015), is used to derive important trip and user characteristics of the bicycle + transit mode. Finally, latent class cluster analysis is applied to find prototypical users of this mode on the basis of their socio-demographic attributes.

It is, for example, found that the most important purposes of the bicycle and transit mode are work or education, typically involving relatively long distances. Bicycle and transit-potential for other transit network levels, such as metros and bus rapid transit can be found. Moreover, seven unique user groups – from middle-aged professionals to school children – are identified, and their different travel behaviour is discussed.

The wider benefits of high quality public transport for cities

The true value of public transport is often underestimated systematically while assessing transit impacts of proposed projects. During the planning and assessment of new or improved connections, infrastructure or services, often only the costs of operations, construction and the revenues with regard to fares and travel time savings are accounted for. This approach provides insights into the performance of public transport to some extent, but disregards many other (positive) effects the provision of public services has. Many of which impose an advantage over competing modes of transport. This could result in the postponement or even cancellation of plans, as means are scarce and invested where gains are directly visible. Thus, to enable a fairer assessment of public transport plans, more insight is required into the wider benefits of its operations and impacts on passengers and the environment.

To gain these insights, we developed a methodology to quantify the value of public transport using the five E’s: Effective mobility, Efficient city, Economy, Environment and Equity. Together these aspects provide a better indication of all potential benefits of public transport.

Understanding the trip and user characteristics of the combined bicycle and transit mode

Several cities around the world are facing mobility related problems such as traffic congestion and air pollution. Although limited individually, the combination of bicycle and transit offers speed and accessibility; by complementing each other’s characteristics the bicycle and transit combination can compete with automobiles. Recognising this, several studies have investigated policies that encourage integration of these modes. However, empirical analysis of the actual users and trips of the combined mode is largely missing. This study addresses this gap by (i) reviewing empirical findings on related modes, (ii) deriving user and trip characteristics of the bicycle and transit mode in the Netherlands, and (iii) applying latent class cluster analysis to discover prototypical users based on their socio-demographic attributes. Most trips by this mode are found to be for relatively long commutes where transit is in the form of trains, and bicycle and walking are access and egress modes respectively. Furthermore, seven user groups are identified and their spatial and temporal travel behaviour is discussed. Transport authorities may use the empirical results in this study to further streamline integration of bicycle and transit for its largest users as well as to tailor policies to attract more travellers.

Find our Thredbo conference presentation HERE

Read our paper HERE

Modelling Multimodal Transit Networks: Integration of bus networks with walking and cycling

Demand for (public) transportation is subject to dynamics affected by technological, spatial, societal and demographic aspects. The political environment, together with financial and spatial constraints limit the possibilities to address transit issues arising from growing demand through the construction of new infrastructure. Upgrading of existing services and improving integration over the entire trip chain (including cycling) are two options that can address these transport issues. However, transport planners and transport service operators often fail to include the entire trip when improving services, as improvement is normally achieved through the adaptations of characteristics (e.g. speeds, stop distances) of the services.
Our developed framework consists of two parts: one to assess the characteristics of the different bus services and their access and egress modes, and one to assess the effects of integration of these services, which includes the modelling and analysis in a regional transit model. The framework has successfully been applied to a case study showing that bus systems with higher frequencies and speeds can attract twice the amount of cyclists on the access and egress sides. It also shows that passengers accept longer access and egress distances with more positive characteristics of the bus service (higher speeds, higher frequencies).

Find the presentation of Judith Brand at MT-ITS in Napoli HERE

Find our paper HERE

A data-driven approach to infer spatial characteristics and service reliability of public transport hubs

Public transport hubs play an important and a central role in public transport networks by connecting several public transport lines from one or multiple network levels. Hubs can be characterized by a large relative and absolute number of transferring passengers between public transport services within the same network level and/or between different network levels. Hubs are especially important with respect to service reliability of passenger journeys, since missing connections at hubs can substantially increase the nominal and perceived passenger journey travel time. The availability of AFC and AVL data allows an in-depth analysis of hub definition, identification, characterization and reliability performance evaluation. Such analysis enables optimisation of synchronisation of schedules, thereby increase the level of service reliability.

Find our TransitData2017 presentation HERE

Insights into door-to-door travel patterns of public transport passengers

Public transport enables fast and reliable station to station journeys. To assess passenger travel patterns and to infer actual quality of service, smartcard and AVL data offer great opportunities. There is, however, an increasing interest in insights into access and egress dynamics of public transport riders as well. What is the size of a stop’s catchment area, which modes are used, and how long and reliable are access and egress times? The answers to these and other questions enable optimization of the total mobility system, thereby also increasing public transport ridership and efficiency. Sufficient biking access of public transport stops (routes and parking), for instance, offer opportunities to increase public transport stopping distances, thereby increasing operational speed and reliability, without compromising accessibility of service areas. We developed a methodology to calculate and demonstrate these dynamics by using new and existing data technologies, namely AVL, survey and new promising app.

Find the Transit Data Conference abstract HERE and our presentation HERE

Monitoren van kwaliteit en beleving van multimodale OV ketens voor betere prognoses

De bereikbaarheid van steden staat onder druk. Door de toename van bewoners, bedrijven en bezoekers is de verwachting dat de stedelijke bereikbaarheid verder onder druk komt te staan. Tot voorkort was het niet goed mogelijk om de kwaliteit (reistijd, betrouwbaarheid en beleving) van de gehele OV deur-tot-deur reis en de first en last mile te meten. Deze inzichten zijn essentieel om het effect van ontwikkelingen en maatregelen in te schatten.

Samen met het ministerie van I en M en de Metropoolregio Amsterdam hebben we een werkmethode ontwikkeld en toegepast om de kwaliteit van de gehele deur-tot-deur reis te beoordelen. In de eerste maanden van 2016 is een pilot voor de werkmethode uitgevoerd tussen Amsterdam en Haarlem. In deze pilot is de kwaliteit (reistijd, betrouwbaarheid en beleving) van de deur-tot-deur reis onderzocht met bestaande data (OV-chipkaart en NDOV) en direct vanuit de reiziger (enquêtes en apps). Met een nieuw ontwikkelde tool is met behulp van open data van zowel het stedelijke als landelijke OV (bijv. GVB en NS) inzicht gekregen in de geleverde kwaliteit. Met behulp van een nieuwe app zijn inzichten verkregen in ketenverplaatsingen, zoals fiets-OV.

De methodiek en nieuwe tooling heeft bewezen de benodigde inzichten op te leveren. Daarnaast blijkt uit de pilot onder meer dat:
– de combinatie van gegevens een goede werkmethode oplevert voor auto, OV, fiets en combinaties daartussen en voor de gehele deur-tot-deur reis (inclusief first en last mile).
– de objectieve en subjectieve waarde van reistijd, betrouwbaarheid en beleving per stukje van de reis regelmatig van elkaar verschillen. Zo wordt een betrouwbare en gemiddeld snelle OV-reis toch beleefd als lage kwaliteit.

De resultaten van de pilot zijn veelbelovend voor verdere ontwikkeling en toepassingen.

Bekijk de Platos presentatie HIER

Inzichten in dynamische effecten van openbaar vervoer door combinatie van statische en dynamische OV modellen

Steden worden steeds populairder om te wonen, werken en te recreëren. Deze trek naar de stad legt steeds meer druk op de hoogwaardige OV-assen in en van/naar de stad. Naast snelheid en frequentie zijn betrouwbaarheid en drukte belangrijke kwaliteitsaspecten voor zowel reiziger als vervoerder. Om deze OV-assen hoogwaardig en efficiënt te kunnen (blijven) exploiteren zijn inzichten in te verwachte effecten van nieuwe ontwikkelingen en maatregelen essentieel. Afgelopen decennium zijn er grote stappen gezet op het gebied van OV modellering. Er zijn goede, statische modellen beschikbaar voor OV prognoses. Desondanks is voor beter inzicht in bijvoorbeeld toekomstige betrouwbaarheid en drukte behoefte aan een meer dynamische modelomgeving, zonder het hoge detailniveau van microsimulatie. TU Delft en Goudappel zijn daarom een verkenning gestart naar toepassing van dynamische OV toedelingsmodellen, (agent-based, mesoscopisch). De basis hiervoor, BusMezzo, is ontwikkeld door KTH Stockholm en wordt daarnaast ook al via TU Delft toegepast in Nederlandse studies.

Deze verkenning richt zich op het modelleren van openbaar vervoer met zowel OmniTRANS, de modelleringsoftware voor het gros van de regionale en stedelijke modellen in Nederland, als BusMezzo, een dynamisch simulatiemodel voor OV toedeling. Het doel van dit project is om te verkennen in hoeverre een dynamisch model waarde kan toevoegen ten opzichte van een statisch model, en welke stappen genomen moeten worden om deze modellen met elkaar te laten communiceren. Naast theoretische analyse is een case studie van de metro van Amsterdam uitgevoerd.

BusMezzo is in staat om elk voertuig en elke reiziger individueel te simuleren en kan daarmee de volledige interactie tussen reiziger en voertuig meenemen in de toedeling. De impact van crowding wordt volledig gemodelleerd, door het toepassen van volume-afhankelijke halteertijden, denied boarding, en door reizigers ervaren reistijd als gevolg van discomfort in drukke voertuigen. Hiermee ontstaat een verrijking ten opzichte van statische modellen.

Een wederzijdse uitwisseling van input en output data tussen de beide modellen is mogelijk. Het ligt voor de hand om een tweetrapsraket te maken van beide modellen, waarbij de kracht van beiden wordt gecombineerd. Hiermee kunnen meer en betere inzichten worden verkregen voor verwachte effecten van ontwikkelingen en/of OV maatregelen. Daarmee wordt een grote verbeterslag in prognoses en bijv. kostenbaten-analyses gemaakt.

Bekijk de Platos presentatie HIER

Spoorcollege: stedelijke rail

Het Nederlandse spoorwegennet van 1839 – 2039 (zowel voor reizigers als goederen) met Maurits van Witsen, Max Philips en Niels van Oort

Niet alleen in de samenleving, maar ook in onze sector gaan de ontwikkelingen in een hoog tempo. Niet alleen door de komst van computergestuurde auto’s en ‘Internet of Things’ maar ook door de ontwikkeling van het, deels gedecentraliseerde spoorwegennet, de veranderende goederenstromen, de klimaatveranderingen en de steeds wijzigende relatie van de overheid met de vervoerbedrijven. De leden van Railforum kijken regelmatig vooruit. We verkennen verschillende scenario’s en stellen gezamenlijk toekomstbeelden op. Maar hoe goed zijn we op de hoogte van de historische achtergronden?

Maurice Adams zei ooit: “Wie de ogen sluit voor het verleden, is blind voor de toekomst”.
Dus vandaar dat Railforum in samenwerking met de NVBS, conform de Spoorcolleges tijdens de SpoorParade in 2014, vier bijeenkomsten organiseert waar diverse experts lezingen geven. Accent ligt op de geschiedkundige context van, en een doorkijk naar nieuwe ontwikkelingen. Aansluitend is er ruimte voor vragen en is er een netwerkborrel. Bij het uitnodigen letten we extra op de vier verschillende generaties in onze sector, zodat specifieke kennis en de historische context daarvan wordt overgedragen aan de bouwers van onze toekomst.

Zie de slides HIER

en een kort verslag van OV-PRO HIER

International rail summit 2016: Big Data and rail

Big Data also enter the railway industry. Board computers, passenger smart cards and cell phones provide valuable data to enhance design of networks and timetables. Big Data supports the improvement of transport models and cost benefit analyses (CBAs). An example of success was the approval of a new light rail in Utrecht, the Netherlands. It was not common use to consider reliability benefits explicitly, but in this case they were responsible for the positive cost benefit ratio.

Find my presentation at the Railsummit 2016 HERE

Rail summit website

© 2011 TU Delft